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Notre Dame Burns. As Does Our Civilization?

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 / Nine-hundred years of heritage and beauty were left in smoldering ashes today after a fire consumed the once-great Cathedral of Notre Dame. 

  • How eerily the burning of Notre Dame could symbolize the demise of Western Civilization.
  • What a horrible way for the West and France to begin Holy Week.

 
Devin Foley, Intellectual Takeout

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April 15, 2019 | Back in college, and before I converted to Catholicism, I had the great fortune of visiting the Cathedral. Unfortunately, I didn’t appreciate it nearly enough. As a typical college kid, I went in and looked around, but I did not savor the moment. No, it was just one of several things planned for the day before I was free to drink wine with my buddies in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower. 
 
I had always hoped to revisit the Cathedral. I knew I failed to properly appreciate her beauty, grandeur, and heritage the first time. That opportunity is now lost as rebuilding will probably take the remainder of my life -- and it won't be the same. 

http://www.intellectualtakeout.org/sites/ito/files/styles/medium/public/screen_shot_2017-11-10_at_10.53.46_am.png?itok=ubE10kJZDevin Foley is the co-founder and Chief Executive Officer of Intellectual Takeout and a graduate of Hillsdale College where he studied history and political science.
 

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How women and minorities are claiming their right to rage

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Serena Williams argues with umpire Carlos Ramos at the 2018 US Open. Photograph: Mike Stobe/Getty Images for USTA

Why do many think it acceptable for the white judge Brett Kavanaugh to lose his cool in public, but not the black tennis champion Serena Williams?

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Soraya Chemaly, the Guardian

Sat 11 May 2019 | Anger is typically defined as a strong feeling of displeasure, hostility or aggression. Mainly, we think of it in terms of individual feelings, and we associate those feelings with isolating behaviours that cause discomfort or fear in ourselves or in others.

Anger is, however, also a critically useful and positive emotion – one that is, contrary to being isolating, deeply social and socially constructed. Anger warns us, as humans, that something is wrong and needs to change. Anger is the human response to being threatened with indignity, physical harm, humiliation and unfairness. Anger drives us to demand accountability, a powerful force for political good. As such, it is often what drives us to form creative, joyous and politically vibrant communities. 

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Cinco de Mayo

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  • In the United States, Cinco de Mayo is widely interpreted as a celebration of Mexican culture and heritage, particularly in areas with substantial Mexican-American populations.
  • Related: From the Archives | The Many Meanings of May Day

Editors, History.com

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May 3, 2019 | Cinco de Mayo, or the fifth of May, is a holiday that celebrates the date of the Mexican army’s 1862 victory over France at the Battle of Puebla during the Franco-Mexican War. The day, which falls on Sunday, May 5 in 2019, is also known as Battle of Puebla Day. While it is a relatively minor holiday in Mexico, in the United States, Cinco de Mayo has evolved into a commemoration of Mexican culture and heritage, particularly in areas with large Mexican-American populations.

Cinco de Mayo history

In 1861, Benito Juárez—a lawyer and member of the indigenous Zapotec tribe—was elected president of Mexico. At the time, the country was in financial ruin after years of internal strife, and the new president was forced to default on debt payments to European governments.

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Related:

From the Archives | The Many Meanings of May Day, David Clark, Mental Floss
https://www.thoughtco.com/thmb/zfLVd2NgjTCvxNoUpwiZsQE_zMk=/768x0/filters:no_upscale():max_bytes(150000):strip_icc()/Haymarket-color-3000-3x2gty-56a48a043df78cf77282df02.jpg / The Haymarket Riot: 1886 Chicago Labor Incident

  • May Day means many things to many people, from pagans to factory workers to troubled boaters.
  • David Clark is here to explain it all.

 

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From the Archives | The Many Meanings of May Day

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The Haymarket Riot: 1886 Chicago Labor Incident

May Day means many things to many people, from pagans to factory workers to troubled boaters. David Clark is here to explain it all.

David Clark, Mental Floss

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Wherever the winters are cold, wet, or overcast, the prime weeks of spring inspire elation and revelry. Finally, we can stop being irritable, morose winter brutes and commence our exuberant sun worship.
 

So around the end of April and beginning of May, the Romans honored their flower and fertility goddess Flora with dances, processions, games, and sundry merriment. Lots of this merriment involved prostitutes, rarely clothed. Of course everyone thinks the "Floralia" festival had roots in older earth and goddess worshipping cultures; defenders of Roman Virtue have blamed the Floralia's rampant licentiousness -- including nude mimes! -- on those randy and uncivil primitives. Arguably, the Romans had lewd habits all their own, even before Caligula -- but we won't get into that.

David Clark is an historian.

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Cinco de MayoEditors, History.com

https://images.vexels.com/media/users/3/150327/raw/a2ffd9ef3bc60b4d157eb49db47f2449-cinco-de-mayo-illustrated-poster.jpgIn the United States, Cinco de Mayo is widely interpreted as a celebration of Mexican culture and heritage, particularly in areas with substantial Mexican-American populations.
Related: From the Archives | The Many Meanings of May Day

 

 

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From the Archives | Why Easter Is Called Easter, and Other Little-Known Facts About the Holiday

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Easter is quite similar to other major holidays like Christmas and Halloween, which have evolved over the last 200 years or so. In all of these holidays, Christian and non-Christian (pagan) elements have continued to blend together.

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Editor%20Comment%20icon_0.jpg / Intellectual Takeout originally published this story on April 13, 2017.
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Brent Landau, Intellectual Takeout

April 19, 2019 | This April 1, Christians will be celebrating Easter, the day on which the resurrection of Jesus is said to have taken place. The date of celebration changes from year to year.

The reason for this variation is that Easter always falls on the first Sunday after the first full moon following the spring equinox. So, in 2019, Easter will be celebrated on April 21, and on April 12 in 2020.

I am a religious studies scholar specializing in early Christianity, and my research shows that this dating of Easter goes back to the complicated origins of this holiday and how it has evolved over the centuries.

Brent Landau is a religious studies scholar specializing in early Christianity.

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