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Minneapolis and the siren song of economic impact

  • Perhaps, however, we should resist the "sweet enchantment" of those economic projections, take them with a pinch of salt or at least try to understand what they mean.
  • Here’s Minnesota’s game plan to land the Super Bowl — but is it worth it?
  • Here's How The NFL Makes A Killing Off Of Taxpayers

Marlys Harris, MinnPost

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NicolletMallGrovesRedesign640.jpg Rendering of the "Nicollet Groves" area of a Nicollet Mall redesign. James Corner Field Operations Team

03/25/14 | It barely matters what the idea is — a new transit line, a baseball field, a hospital, an apartment complex, a widened road or expanded sewer system. Many of us, like terrible 2-year-olds, react with a petulant "no."    

But that resistance is often overwhelmed by the sweet yoo-hoo of the economic-impact study. Generally, one comes with each new proposal for civic improvement. Almost invariably, it predicts that the new project, whatever it is, will produce goodies beyond compare — jobs in the hundreds or thousands, spending in the millions, higher real-estate values and plushy tax revenues. Impressed, we say, "OK, let's do it."

A Minnesota native, Marlys Harris has been an investigative reporter and editor with specialties in consumer protection and finance for Money Magazine and Consumer Reports. 

Full story…

Related:

Here’s Minnesota’s game plan to land the Super Bowl — but is it worth it?

Briana Bierschbach, MinnPost 

VikingsStadiumFireworks640.jpg The new stadium isn’t built yet, but the plan is to have it finished by 2016 and Super Bowl-ready two years later. / Minnesota Vikings

01/30/14 | There are a few key ingredients to winning a Super Bowl in your home state. First get a handful of prominent business leaders in the mix, followed by the ringing endorsement of local and statewide politicians. Then bring up the fancy restaurants, convention centers and hotel rooms and raise a few million dollars. Last but not least, throw in a new football stadium.  

That’s the blueprint Gov. Mark Dayton and an all-new Super Bowl committee are working from as they aim to bring the 2018 game to the Vikings stadium in Minneapolis. The new stadium isn’t built yet, but the plan is to have it finished by 2016 and Super Bowl-ready two years later. By that time, it will have been more than 25 years since the football spectacle was held in Minnesota.

Briana Bierschbach reports on public affairs, higher education, politics and other important topics and issues in the news. 

Full story...

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Series | Super Bowl XLVIII Illustrated, Part Four: the concussion defense, Jason Novak and Mike Duncan, theguardian.com

  • The final installment in a four-part series
  • Series | Super Bowl XLVIII Illustrated, Part Three: the great pinkwash 
  • Series | Super Bowl XLVIII Illustrated, Part Two: the stadium swindle
  • Series | Super Bowl XLVIII Illustrated, Part One: the NFL gameplan
  • Here's How The NFL Makes A Killing Off Of Taxpayers

Don't Let Corporate Lobbyists Speak for You on Minimum Wage

Banner%20Corporate%20Accountability.jpg

  • Don’t let the US Chamber of Commerce and corporate lobbyists against a raise speak for you.
  • Why Costco?

Holly and Bob, Business for a Fair Minimum Wage

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End%20Corporate%20Greed%20Occupy.jpg February 22, 2014 | From Costco, Eileen Fisher, Dansko, Ben & Jerry’s, Seventh Generation, Organic Valley, and New Belgium Brewing to Zingerman’s, UnCommon Goods, ABC Home, Parnassus Investments, Longfellow Clubs and Vintage Vinyl – businesses big and small are signing the Business for a Fair Minimum Wage statement supporting a minimum wage increase. Won’t you join us today?

Today’s $7.25 an hour federal minimum wage is the same as it was in 1950 and a third less than in 1968, adjusting for inflation. We can’t build a strong economy on a falling floor. Workers are also consumers. Today’s minimum wage impoverishes working families and undermines the consumer demand that businesses depend on to survive and grow. Instead of raising wages, Walmart, McDonald’s and other low-paying companies are pointing workers to charity and public assistance.

Take%20Action%20button%20with%20arrows.jpgWould you sign the Business for a Fair Minimum Wage statement in favor of gradually raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by 2016? Or, if you already signed, help spread the word!

The more business people publicly FOR a minimum wage increase, the stronger our likelihood of success. Don’t let the US Chamber of Commerce and corporate lobbyists against a raise speak for you.

Click here to Tell a Friend

  • Sample Tweet: [your biz or biz org], Costco, Eileen Fisher, big & sm biz signing @MinimumWageBiz petition to raise minimum wage-Join us! #raisethewage bit.ly/187FFui
  • Sample Facebook Post: Momentum is building for a minimum wage raise with [Your biz or biz organization here], Costco, Eileen Fisher, New Belgium Brewing, Ben & Jerry’s, Dansko footwear, Seventh Generation, Organic Valley, ABC Home, Zingerman’s, UnCommon Goods, Vintage Vinyl and a growing number of businesses and business alliances voicing support. 
  • Check out the issue and if you are a business owner or executive join us by signing the business statement here

Current Federal Signers

Thank you very much!

Related:

images/costco_wholesale_214_64.pngWhy Costco? Peter Dreier, Huffington Post

  • 01/29/2014 | On Wednesday, on the heels of his landmark State of the Union speech about income inequality, President Barack Obama will be touring a Costco store in Lanham, Maryland. Why Costco and not Walmart, which is a much bigger and better-known discount retailer?
  • The answer is that Costco's labor practices help reduce income inequality while Walmart's labor practices widen it. Yes, Walmart is better-known, but what it's known for is low wages and abusive labor practices.

The Real Welfare Queens

Banner%20Corporate%20Accountability.jpg

  • Most of the political rhetoric about dependency is punitively aimed at the poor. That’s because, unlike the huge corporations receiving all those subsidies, the poor don’t have armies of lobbyists and truckloads of campaign contributions.
  • A new report shows corporations like Koch Industries have gotten billions in government subsidies.
  • Series | Are Polluting Mining Corporations like PolyMet Sociopathic?, Part II
  • Series | Are Polluting Mining Corporations like PolyMet Sociopathic?, Part I
  • Duluth doctors: PolyMet study skips health impacts

David Sirota, In These Times

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Corporate%20Welfare%20Piggy%20Bank.jpg February 28, 2014 | Remember when President Obama was lambasted for saying “you didn't build that”? Turns out he was right, at least when it comes to lots of stuff built by the world’s wealthiest corporations. That’s the takeaway from this week’s new study of 25,000 major taxpayer subsidy deals over the last two decades.

Entitled “Subsidizing the Corporate One Percent,” the report from the taxpayer watchdog group Good Jobs First shows that the world’s largest companies aren’t models of self-sufficiency and unbridled capitalism. To the contrary, they’re propped up by billions of dollars in welfare payments from state and local governments. 

David Sirota is a staff writer for PandoDaily, television commentator and nationally syndicated weekly newspaper columnist and has written for the New York Times Magazine, Harper’s, Wired, Vice, The Nation, and Salon.com. He covers the intersection of politics, technology and popular culture.

End%20Corporate%20Greed%20Occupy.jpg Full story…

 

Related:

Series | Are Polluting Mining Corporations like PolyMet Sociopathic?, Part II, Gary G. Kohls, Duty to Warn

  • Experienced psychologists tell us that sociopathic individuals that have committed crimes have to be locked away or otherwise isolated to protect society from them.
  • Series | Are Polluting Mining Corporations like PolyMet Sociopathic?, Part I

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Series | Are Polluting Mining Corporations like PolyMet Sociopathic?, Part IGary G. KohlsDuty to Warn

In 2010 the NeoConservative, pro-corporate, anti-democratic Roberts’ 5/4 Supreme Court’s decided in the  Citizens United vs. Federal Election Commission ruling to grant personhood to corporations by allowing unlimited, anonymous monetary contributions to political campaigns and candidates. This ruling, called by many to be the worst Supreme Court decision of the past century, has emboldened the already powerful and corruptible multinational corporations (that now have achieved dominion over US politics as well as the economy) to “buy” any number of politicians and brain-wash voters by multi-million dollar ad campaigns that the rest of us can’t afford to counter in state and national elections.

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Duluth doctors: PolyMet study skips health impacts, John Myers, St. Paul (MN) Pioneer Press

  • The 19 health care professionals say the state and federal agencies conducting environmental impact statement "have not been clear about the health impacts that sulfide mining will have on the people of northeastern Minnesota and visitors to the region."
  • Take action to stop PolyMet from getting a permit!

 

 

Series | Are Polluting Mining Corporations like PolyMet Sociopathic?, Part II

Mining%20Truth.jpg

  • "Slavery is the legal fiction that a person is property. Corporate personhood is the legal fiction that property is a person." -- Anonymous
  • Series | Are Polluting Mining Corporations like PolyMet Sociopathic?, Part I
  • Duluth doctors: PolyMet study skips health impacts

Gary G. Kohls, Duty to Warn

March 11, 2014 | Experienced psychologists tell us that sociopathic individuals that have committed crimes have to be locked away or otherwise isolated to protect society from them.

As a review of last week’s column, part 1, I reprint below the seven diagnostic criteria that are used to diagnose antisocial (aka, sociopathic or psychopathic) personality disorder in humans. Be mindful that only three of the seven are needed to make the diagnosis.

1) callous disregard for the feelings of other people

2) the incapacity to maintain human relationships

3) reckless disregard for the safety of others

4) aggressiveness

5) deceitfulness (repeated lying and conning others for profit)

6) incapacity to experience guilt and

7) the failure to conform to social norms and respect for the law.

Gary G. Kohls is a retired physician who writes about issues of war, peace, justice, mental health and nonviolence and feels it is important to mix religion and non-partisan politics. 

Full story…

Related:

Series | Are Polluting Mining Corporations like PolyMet Sociopathic?, Part I, Gary G. KohlsDuty to Warn

March 4, 2014 | In 2010 the NeoConservative, pro-corporate, anti-democratic Roberts’ 5/4 Supreme Court’s decided in the  Citizens United vs. Federal Election Commission ruling to grant personhood to corporations by allowing unlimited, anonymous monetary contributions to political campaigns and candidates. This ruling, called by many to be the worst Supreme Court decision of the past century, has emboldened the already powerful and corruptible multinational corporations (that now have achieved dominion over US politics as well as the economy) to “buy” any number of politicians and brain-wash voters by multi-million dollar ad campaigns that the rest of us can’t afford to counter in state and national elections.

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Duluth doctors: PolyMet study skips health impacts, John Myers, St. Paul (MN) Pioneer Press

Environment%20Banner.jp

  • The 19 health care professionals say the state and federal agencies conducting environmental impact statement "have not been clear about the health impacts that sulfide mining will have on the people of northeastern Minnesota and visitors to the region."
  • sign-btn.png  Take action to stop PolyMet from getting a permit!

John Nichols | Vermont Votes for Public Banking

  • "When the prairie populists of the North Dakota Non-Partisan League swept to power a century ago, with their promise to take on the plutocrats, one of the first orders of business was the establishment of state-run bank." 
  • The Stone That Brings Down Goliath

John Nichols, The Nation

Starbuck's Cafe LatteIf you like reading this article, consider joining the crew of all reader-supported Evergreene Digest by contributing the equivalent of a cafe latte a month--using the donation button above—so we can bring you more just like it.

7234-capitol-money-black-white-071512.jpg March 9, 2014 | When the prairie populists of the North Dakota Non-Partisan League swept to power a century ago, with their promise to take on the plutocrats, one of the first orders of business was the establishment of state-run bank.

They did just that. And in just a few years the Bank of North Dakota will celebrate a 100th anniversary of assuring safe stewardship of state funds, providing loans at affordable rates and steering revenues toward the support of public projects.

John Nichols writes about politics and media issues for The Nation magazine as its Washington correspondent. He is a contributing writer for The Progressive and In These Times and the associate editor of the Capital Times, the daily newspaper in Madison, WI. His articles have appeared in the New York Times, Chicago Tribune and dozens of other newspapers.

Full story…

Related:

The Stone That Brings Down Goliath, Ellen Brown, Web of Debt

  • cover-thumb.jpg?w=160&h=235 Wall Street banks are deemed “too big to fail” only because there is no viable alternative – but there could be. Local governments could form their own publicly-owned banks, on the model of the state-owned Bank of North Dakota. They could then put their revenues, their savings, and their newly-acquired real estate into those public utilities, to be used to generate interest-free credit for the local government (since it would own the bank) and low-cost credit for the local community. For more on this promising option, which has been or is being explored in almost half the state legislatures in the U.S., go here
  • The end of "Too big to fail."

 

Are Polluting Mining Corporations like PolyMet Sociopathic?

Mining%20Truth.jpg

  • "Slavery is the legal fiction that a person is property. Corporate personhood is the legal fiction that property is a person." -- Anonymous
  • Duluth doctors: PolyMet study skips health impacts

Gary G. Kohls, Duty to Warn

Journalism with real independence and integrity is a rare thing. All reader supported Evergreene Digest relies on reader donations. Click on the donation button above to make a contribution and support our work.

March 4, 2014 | In 2010 the NeoConservative, pro-corporate, anti-democratic Roberts’ 5/4 Supreme Court’s decided in the  Citizens United vs. Federal Election Commission ruling to grant personhood to corporations by allowing unlimited, anonymous monetary contributions to political campaigns and candidates. This ruling, called by many to be the worst Supreme Court decision of the past century, has emboldened the already powerful and corruptible multinational corporations (that now have achieved dominion over US politics as well as the economy) to “buy” any number of politicians and brain-wash voters by multi-million dollar ad campaigns that the rest of us can’t afford to counter in state and national elections.

The US Supreme Court has thus made legal the absurd notion that inanimate corporations like PolyMet and GTac (potential despoilers of northern Minnesota and northern Wisconsin’s irreplaceable wetlands, aquifers and aboriginal land and water rights) deserve the same privileges (but not the same responsibilities) as living humans.

Gary G. Kohls is a retired physician who writes about issues of war, peace, justice, mental health and nonviolence and feels it is important to mix religion and non-partisan politics. 

Full story…

Related:

Duluth doctors: PolyMet study skips health impacts, John Myers, St. Paul (MN) Pioneer Press

Environment%20Banner.jpg

The 19 health care professionals say the state and federal agencies conducting environmental impact statement "have not been clear about the health impacts that sulfide mining will have on the people of northeastern Minnesota and visitors to the region."

Sign_the_PetitionTake action to stop PolyMet from getting a permit!

Why Corporations Want Our Public Schools (Graphic)

  • Where’s the big money in privatization? Take it from the teachers.
  • 7 Most Absurd Things America's Kids Are Learning Thanks to the Conservative Gutting of Public Education

YES! Editors

Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contrubuting Editor Lydia Howell

Thank%20You-sm_0.jpgThis article is made possible with the generous contributions of all reader supported Evergreene Digest readers like you. 

Feb 21, 2014 | 

Full story…

Related:

7 Most Absurd Things America's Kids Are Learning Thanks to the Conservative Gutting of Public Education, Katie Halper, AlterNet

  • Kids learn that gun control is a gateway to tyranny and that science is unchristian.
  • Publicly Funded Schools That Are Allowed to Teach Creationism

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