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Critical Thinking

Critical Thinking LogoImagine a world where every person had complete access to the truth
AND
had sufficient education to separate it from propaganda.
A goal of this site is to provide unbiased access to the truth. This section, in particular, is devoted to helping readers recognize the truth, in the midst of all the propaganda.

Why Do We Fear Challenging Authority?

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  • I want to ask you three questions: Are you scared to make your own judgment (irrespective of the number of others, including experts, who make a similar judgment)? Are you scared to be labelled a 'conspiracy theorist' if you believe something contrary to the official (that is, the elite) narrative? And why?
  • How activism won real net neutrality

Robert J. Burrowes, Countercurrents.org 

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25 February, 2015 | Have you ever noticed your own inclination, or that of other people, to believe what you/they are told by someone seen to be in authority?

For example, did you know that there is overwhelming scientific evidence that the 9/11 destruction of the World Trade Center buildings 5, 6 and 7 was a false flag operation? That is, 9/11 was organised by the US and/or Israeli elite(s) and their agents in order to enable them to manipulate public opinion to support their subsequently initiated perpetual war in the Middle East and elsewhere.

'Preposterous', you say? Well, if you want to consider the scientific evidence (including in relation to World Trade Center Building 7, the third building destroyed on 9/11) which systematically explains why the official version of what happened cannot be true, you can do your own research or, if you want a lead to get started on the extensive evidence, read this document by Professor David Ray Griffin  who has researched and written seven books on the subject – 'The Destruction of the World Trade Center: Why the Official Account of 9/11 Cannot Be True'  – and watch these videos, featuring Prof Dr Niels Harrit  and architect Richard Gage.  For evidence indicating an Israeli role, see the book 'Solving 9-11: The Deception That Changed the World' reviewed here

Robert J. Burrowes, has a lifetime commitment to understanding and ending human violence. He has done extensive research since 1966 in an effort to understand why human beings are violent and has been a nonviolent activist since 1981. He is the author of 'Why Violence?'.

Full story … 

Related:

How activism won real net neutrality, Jay Cassano, Waging Nonviolence

  • “This is a classic example of how history gets written,” said Kevin Zeese, an organizer with Popular Resistance.“ Down the road, 50 years from now, people will say that Obama saved the Internet, that he was the president who said what needs to be done and made it happen. But the reality is that Obama was forced to save the Internet by the people.”
  • Net neutrality activists score landmark victory in fight to govern the internet

Series | Considering the Problem of Race in America, Part 6: Philosophy’s Lost Body and Soul

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This is the sixth in a series of interviews with philosophers on race that I am conducting for The Stone. This week’s conversation is with Linda Martín Alcoff, a professor of philosophy at Hunter College and the CUNY Graduate Center. She was the president of the American Philosophical Association, Eastern Division, for 2012-13. She is the author of “Visible Identities: Race, Gender, and the Self.” — George Yancy

George Yancy and Linda Martin Alcoff, The Stone / New York Times

 

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February 4, 2015 | George Yancy: What is the relationship between your identity as a Latina philosopher and the philosophical interrogation of race in your work?

Linda Martín Alcoff: Every single person has a racial identity, at least in Western societies, and so one might imagine that the topic of race is of universal interest. Yet for those of us who are not white — or less fully white, shall I say — the reality of race is shoved in our faces in particularly unsettling ways, often from an early age. This can spark reflection as well as nascent social critique.

The relationship between my identity and my philosophical interest in race is simply a continuation through the tools of philosophy the pursuit that I began as a kid, growing up in Florida in the 1960s, watching the civil rights movement as it was portrayed in the media and perceived by the various parts of my family, white and nonwhite. I experienced school desegregation, the end of Jim Crow, and the war in Indochina, a war that also made apparent the racial categories used to differentiate peoples, at enormous cost. It was clear to me from a young age that “we” were the ones with no value for life, at least the life of those who were not white.

The Stone is a forum for contemporary philosophers and other thinkers on issues both timely and timeless.

George Yancy is a professor of philosophy at Duquesne University. He has written, edited and co-edited numerous books, including “Black Bodies, White Gazes,” “Look, a White!” and “Pursuing Trayvon Martin,” co-edited with Janine Jones.

 

Full story … 

 

Related:

 

Part 5: What’s Wrong With ‘All Lives Matter’?

This is the fifth in a series of interviews with philosophers on race that I am conducting for The Stone.. This week’s conversation is with Judith Butler, Maxine Elliot Professor in the department of comparative literature and the program of critical theory at the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of numerous influential books, including “Dispossession: The Performative in the Political,” which she co-authored with Athena Athanasiou. She will publish a book on public assemblies with Harvard University Press this year.

Part 4: Black Lives: Between Grief and Action

This is the fourth in a series of interviews with philosophers on race that I am conducting for The Stone. This week’s conversation is with Joy James, a political philosopher who is a professor of the humanities and political science at Williams College.  She is the author of “Seeking the Beloved Community: A Feminist Race Reader.” 

 

Part 3: White Anxiety and the Futility of Black Hope

This is the third in a series of interviews with philosophers on race that I am conducting for The Stone. This week’s conversation is with Shannon Sullivan, a professor in the department of philosophy at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte. She is the author of "Good White People: The Problem with Middle-Class White Anti-Racism."

Part 2: Lost in Rawlsland

This week’s conversation is with Charles Mills, the John Evans Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy at Northwestern University and the author of several books, including the influential 1997 work “The Racial Contract.”

 

Part 1: What ‘White Privilege’ Really Means

This week’s conversation is with Naomi Zack, a professor of philosophy at the University of Oregon and the author of “The Ethics and Mores of Race: Equality After the History of Philosophy.”

Series | Considering the Problem of Race in America, Part 5: What’s Wrong With ‘All Lives Matter’?

heFaceOfJustice.jpeg?itok=7V5AyJvd

This is the fifth in a series of interviews with philosophers on race that I am conducting for The Stone. This week’s conversation is with Judith Butler, Maxine Elliot Professor in the department of comparative literature and the program of critical theory at the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of numerous influential books, including “Dispossession: The Performative in the Political,” which she co-authored with Athena Athanasiou. She will publish a book on public assemblies with Harvard University Press this year. — George Yancy

George Yancy and Judith Butler, The Stone / New York Times

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Judith Butler Credit: Thomas Lohnes/Associated Press13butler-articleInline.jpg

George Yancy: In your 2004 book, “Precarious Life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence,” you wrote, “The question that preoccupies me in the light of recent global violence is, Who counts as human? Whose lives count as lives?”  You wrote that about the post-9/11 world, but it appears to also apply to the racial situation here in the United States. In the wake of the recent killings of unarmed black men and women by police, and the failure to prosecute the killers, the message being sent to black communities is that they don’t matter, that they are “disposable.” Posters reading “Black Lives Matter,” “Hands Up. Don’t Shoot,” “I Can’t Breathe,” communicate the reality of a specific kind of racial vulnerability that black people experience on a daily basis. How does all this communicate to black people that their lives don’t matter?

Judith Butler: Perhaps we can think about the phrase “black lives matter.” What is implied by this statement, a statement that should be obviously true, but apparently is not? If black lives do not matter, then they are not really regarded as lives, since a life is supposed to matter. So what we see is that some lives matter more than others, that some lives matter so much that they need to be protected at all costs, and that other lives matter less, or not at all. And when that becomes the situation, then the lives that do not matter so much, or do not matter at all, can be killed or lost, can be exposed to conditions of destitution, and there is no concern, or even worse, that is regarded as the way it is supposed to be. The callous killing of Tamir Rice and the abandonment of his body on the street is an astonishing example of the police murdering someone considered disposable and fundamentally ungrievable.

George Yancy and Judith Butler, The Stone / New York Times

The Stone is a forum for contemporary philosophers and other thinkers on issues both timely and timeless.

George Yancy is a professor of philosophy at Duquesne University. He has written, edited and co-edited numerous books, including “Black Bodies, White Gazes,” “Look, a White!” and “Pursuing Trayvon Martin,” co-edited with Janine Jones.

Full story … 

Related:

Part 4: Black Lives: Between Grief and Action

This is the fourth in a series of interviews with philosophers on race that I am conducting for The Stone. This week’s conversation is with Joy James, a political philosopher who is a professor of the humanities and political science at Williams College.  She is the author of “Seeking the Beloved Community: A Feminist Race Reader.” --George Yancy

###

Part 3: White Anxiety and the Futility of Black Hope

This is the third in a series of interviews with philosophers on race that I am conducting for The Stone. This week’s conversation is with Shannon Sullivan, a professor in the department of philosophy at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte. She is the author of “Good White People: The Problem with Middle-Class White Anti-Racism. --George Yancy

###

”Part 2: Lost in Rawlsland

This week’s conversation is with Charles Mills, the John Evans Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy at Northwestern University and the author of several books, including the influential 1997 work “The Racial Contract.”--George Yancy

###

Part 1: What ‘White Privilege’ Really Means

This week’s conversation is with Naomi Zack, a professor of philosophy at the University of Oregon and the author of “The Ethics and Mores of Race: Equality After the History of Philosophy.” --George Yancy

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