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Gender & Sexuality

8 Types Of Toxic People To Leave Behind In 2018

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Good riddance.

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Kelsey Borresen and Brittany Wong, Huffington Post

12/28/2017 The new year is an opportunity to let go of the negative people in your life who are holding you back and weighing you down.





We asked experts to tell us which kinds of people you’re better off leaving behind as we head into 2018. Here’s what they had to say.





Whether they’re coworkers, friends or family members, setting boundaries with these toxic people ― or removing them from your life entirely ― can be difficult, but it’s ultimately necessary and freeing.

Kelsey Borresen, Relationships Editor, HuffPost and

Brittany Wong <>, Relationships Editor, HuffPost

Full story … 

The “Me Too” Movement and the Rights of the Accused

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On December 15, Andrea Ramsey, a Democratic candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives, announced she would drop out of a race to represent Kansas's 3rd District. In 2005, Ramsey was accused of sexually harassing a male subordinate, an accusation she has denied. As the allegations resurfaced, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee decided to withdraw its support for her campaign. "In its rush to claim the high ground in our roiling national conversation about harassment, the Democratic Party has implemented a zero tolerance standard," Ramsey said. "For me, that means a vindictive, terminated employee’s false allegations are enough for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) to decide not to support our promising campaign. We are in a national moment where rough justice stands in place of careful analysis, nuance and due process." (Image: Andrea Ramsey for Congress)

Have the men and women accused of sexual harassment lost their right to a fair hearing?

Marilyn Katz, In These Times

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December 29, 2017 | Like many women of the Baby Boom generation who’ve worked outside the home, I’ve experienced the full range of sexual harassment and attempted abuse from absurd comments to unwanted touches or gropes to absolutely scary assaults.



I am disturbed by the mob mentality that seems to have overtaken the nation in addressing the problem. It is one thing to accuse, quite another to equate accusation with guilt.



 

I’m delighted that we women have won the right to declare our bodies off limits to attackers and to call them out is a victory.  That the men who engage in the full spectrum of sexual harassment from the juvenile to the criminal are being brought to account is good.  That those called out have lost their right to a fair hearing and self-defense is not.

http://inthesetimes.com/images/made/images/member_photos/photo_119886_75_75_c1.jpg   Marilyn Katz is a writer, consultant and long-time political activist. She is president of MK Communications, a partner in Democracy Partners and a founder and co-chair of the newly formed Chicago Women Take Action.

Full story … 

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#MeToo In the Fields and Factory: Farm and Auto Workers Show Us How To Organize Against Sexual Violence

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  • Part 1: #MeToo In the Fields: Farmworkers Show Us How To Organize Against Sexual Violence
    • “We have the power to speak and end the silence. We don’t want fear and silence to persist any longer.” -Nely Rodriguez, CIW organizer
  • Part 2: How Tough Is It to Change a Culture of Harassment? Ask Women at Ford
    • Decades after the company tried to tackle sexual misconduct at two Chicago plants, continued abuse raises questions about the possibility of change.
  • Related: Kick Against the Pricks and Other Unsexy Truths About Sexual Harassment

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 

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Part 1: #MeToo In the Fields: Farmworkers Show Us How To Organize Against Sexual Violence

  • The Coalition of Immokalee Workers has spent more than 20 years organizing against hyper-exploitation in Florida's tomato fields.
  • “We have the power to speak and end the silence. We don’t want fear and silence to persist any longer.” -Nely Rodriguez, CIW organizer

Sarah Lazare, In These Times / AlterNet

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December 27, 2017 | Lupe Gonzalo works in the tomato fields of Immokalee, Fla., worlds apart from the Hollywood celebrities whose #MeToo testimony is exposing widespread sexual violence and toppling powerful men. Yet, Gonzalo says that it is women like her, “with no platform and no voice, invisible and vulnerable,” who bear the brunt of workplace sexual assault—and who offer lessons in how to band together to defeat it.

“Of course, it is incredibly important to pay attention to the suffering of all women, particularly women who work in industries and live in a society that doesn’t have protections, basic rights, where abuse is incredibly rampant,” says Gonzalo, referring to the #MeToo movement, first sparked in 2007 by Tarana Burke. “Looking at the extremity of that violence here, farmworkers began to create a solution and built a program to ensure our own rights.”
 
Sarah Lazare is web editor at In These Times. She comes from a background in independent journalism for publications including The Nation, Tom Dispatch, YES! Magazine, and Al Jazeera America. A former staff writer for AlterNet and Common Dreams, Sarah co-edited the book About Face: Military Resisters Turn Against War.

Full story … 





Part 2: How Tough Is It to Change a Culture of Harassment? Ask Women at Ford

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Ford%20Female%20Chicago%20Factory%20Workers.jpgCredit Photographs by Alyssa Schukar for The New York Times

Decades after the company tried to tackle sexual misconduct at two Chicago plants, continued abuse raises questions about the possibility of change.

Susan Chira and Cathrin Einhorn, New York (NY) Times <https://www.nytimes.com>

December 19, 2017 | The jobs were the best they would ever have: collecting union wages while working at Ford, one of America’s most storied companies. But inside two Chicago plants, the women found menace.
Bosses and fellow laborers treated them as property or prey. Men crudely commented on their breasts and buttocks; graffiti of penises was carved into tables, spray-painted onto floors and scribbled onto walls. They groped women, pressed against them, simulated sex acts or masturbated in front of them. Supervisors traded better assignments for sex and punished those who refused.

Susan Chira is an American journalist. She is currently a senior editor and correspondent for gender of the New York Times.

Catrin Einhorn is a journalist at The New York Times who reports and produces narrative-driven work in a variety of media, including print, audio, video and interactive pieces.

Full story … 

Related:

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Stop%20the%20War%20on%20Women%20graphic_1.jpgKick Against the Pricks and Other Unsexy Truths About Sexual Harassment, Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 

  • Part 1: The Unsexy Truth About Harassment
    • Sexual harassment is often understood, like other forms of gender-based violence, as a violation of consent. It is more than that.
  • Part 2: Kick Against the Pricks
  • Will men ever see women as full-fledged human beings rather than ego salves and receptacles?

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Catholic Bishops spearhead letter encouraging parents to reject their transgender kids

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Members of the the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops ride an escalator during a break in sessions at the USCCB's annual fall meeting. Credit: AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

  • This latest rejection of transgender people is not inconsistent with prior Catholic teaching. Last year, Pope Francis called it “ideological colonization to teach that students can “choose their gender.”
  • Religious leaders dismiss the legitimacy of transgender identities as a "false idea."
  • Related: From the Archives | Catholic Bishops End Family Synod With Little To Say To Gays

Zack Ford, Think Progress

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Dec 18, 2017 | The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) has issued a new open letter, signed by many other religious leaders, rejecting the legitimacy of transgender identities. Titled “Created Male and Female,” the open letter asserts that gender and sex “cannot be separated,” calling it a “false idea” that “goes against reason” and “deeply troubling” notion “that a man can be or become a woman or vice versa.”

The letter attempts to simultaneously show compassion to transgender people while simultaneously condemning them. “A person’s discomfort with his or her sex, or the desire to be identified as the other sex, is a complicated reality that needs to be addressed with sensitivity and truth,” the letter states. Trans people deserve “to be heard and treated with respect,” and when they express “concerns” or discuss “wrestling with this challenge,” religious leaders should respond “with compassion, mercy, and honesty” — but not affirmation.

https://i1.wp.com/thinkprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/zack.jpg?w=300&crop=0%2C0px%2C100%2C300px&ssl=1 Zack Ford is the LGBTQ Editor at ThinkProgress.org, where he has covered issues related to marriage equality, transgender rights, education, and "religious freedom," in additional to daily political news. In 2014, The Advocate named Zack one of its "40 under 40" in LGBT media, describing him as "one of the most influential journalists online."

Full story … 

Related:

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From the Archives | Catholic Bishops End Family Synod With Little To Say To Gays, Peter Montgomery, Religion Dispatches 

World Congress of Families Has Plenty To Say, None of it Good; How Same-Sex Marriage Came to a Buddhist Temple in Japan; Global LGBT Recap
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Kick Against the Pricks and Other Unsexy Truths About Sexual Harassment

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  • Part 1: The Unsexy Truth About Harassment
    • Sexual harassment is often understood, like other forms of gender-based violence, as a violation of consent. It is more than that.
  • Part 2: Kick Against the Pricks
    • Will men ever see women as full-fledged human beings rather than ego salves and receptacles?

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 

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Part 1: The Unsexy Truth About Harassment

https://portside.org/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/field/image/ak_harassmentwork_12_13_17.jpg?itok=KwQ1ZBRBSexual harassment is often understood, like other forms of gender-based violence, as a violation of consent. It is more than that.

Melissa Gira Grant, The New York Review of Books / Portside 

December 8, 2017 | On both sides of my subway stop, an ad campaign for the local public radio station, WNYC, has rotated for a few months now. The ads use text message-like taglines: one about the station call letters being your safe word, and another that asks, “You up?” After this week, when two more WNYC hosts were suspended as of Wednesday and placed under investigation for “inappropriate conduct”—Leonard Lopate and Jonathan Schwartz, joining John Hockenberry, who we learned over the weekend was also accused of workplace harassment—the station’s ads now read like leaked transcripts of unwanted sexts.

That’s how I read them. My AIM window once used to light up with messages from my editors and other writers at all hours, though it was one editor who was responsible for most of the late-night notes. This is how I knew he was editing my stories in bed with his wife, and he wanted me to know that he enjoyed it. He told me repeatedly, treating me like I was a secret, though it was one of his own invention, and I was not a participant. I don’t have the messages. It was years ago. I can’t say the words upset me, not then, not now. What they left me with was doubt, a sharp jab coinciding with the moments of accomplishment that I should have been able to enjoy as a writer. To detach myself from that editor meant I had to look at my own work with distance and suspicion. Did it only merit attention because I had? The editor didn’t have to say anything more; I did this doubting to myself. Over time, I stopped.

http://melissagiragrant.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/melissa__bk_3664_v1-750x750.jpg Melissa Gira Grant  is a journalist and author, covering sexual politics, criminal justice, and human rights. She is a contributing writer for Pacific Standard and the Village Voice, and a writer in residence with the Fair Punishment Project (a joint initiative of Harvard Law School’s Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race & Justice and its Criminal Justice Institute).

Full story … 

Part 2: Kick Against the Pricks

http://cdn.nybooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/kipnis_1-122117.jpg Donald Trump with Allie LaForce (Miss Teen USA), Natalie Glebova (Miss Universe), and Chelsea Cooley (Miss USA) at a launch party for Cara Birnbaum’s book Universal Beauty: The Miss Universe Guide to Beauty, Trump Tower, New York City, April 2006 Gabriela Maj/Patrick McMullan/Getty Images

  • Be Fierce: Stop Harassment and Take Your Power Back ~ Gretchen Carlson
  • Will men ever see women as full-fledged human beings rather than ego salves and receptacles? Until that day, the accusations and exposés will continue: the floodgates have opened and aren’t closing anytime soon.

Laura Kipnis, The New York Review of Books

http://cdn.nybooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/kipnis_2-122117.jpg Gretchen Carlson shortly after she was crowned Miss America, September 1988  Michael Schwartz/New York Post Archives/Getty Images

December 21, 2017 | At first it was a lot of enormous media potentates crashing to earth, followed by a bunch of lesser despots and lords, many employed in the media industries too, and it soon expanded to include half the men in Hollywood and ancillary trades like politics. The accompanying din was the clamor of pundits (those who hadn’t yet been felled themselves) attempting to explain what had happened—then reexplain, then explain some more—because the picture kept changing: soon the not-so-powerful were under fire too (freelance writers and experimental novelists were among those anonymously charged in an online list), and it was becoming unclear whether it was “toxic masculinity” or masculine panic we were talking about.

But at the beginning, the story seemed plain enough. It turns out that in the tallest skyscrapers and plushest hotels of the most advanced economies, many high-profile men have been acting the part of feudal lords, demanding droit du seigneur from their vassals, the vassals in this case being their female employees and others wishing entry into their fiefdoms. Evidently there’s been a covert system of taxation on female advancement in the work world, with the unluckier among us obligated to render not just the usual fealty demanded by overweening bosses but varying degrees of sexual homage too, from ego-stroking and fluffing (which is gross enough), to being grabbed and groped, to the expectation of silence about full-on rape.

Laura Kipnis is a Professor in the Department of Radio, TV, and Film at Northwestern. Her books include How to Become a Scandal: Adventures in Bad Behavior and Unwanted Advances: Sexual Paranoia Comes to Campus. (December 2017)

Full story … 

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